Two Historic East Austin Trails Getting a Boost

December 12, 2013 by Kate Harrington

There’s a lot of development going on in East Austin right now – but not all of it is in the form of buildings.

Two historic walking trails that span about 10 miles in East Austin are getting an overhaul from local and national officials. The Tejano Healthy Walking Trail and Trail of Tejano Music Legends promote the history and culture of East Austin, and highlight Latino musicians.

While the trails were designated last year by the U.S. Department of the Interior as National Recreation Trails, much of the trails aren’t very visible. The Tejano Trails Steering Committee and the National Park Service’s Rivers, Trails, & Conservation Assistance Program are creating a strategic plan for the trails that will create shorter, more navigable routes and make the trail more visible. There’s also a plan to create a virtual version.

VelasquezPark

Developers are also pitching in. Cypress Real Estate Advisors, the developers behind the Corazon vertical mixed use project between East 5th and East 6th Streets, are also revitalizing Velasquez Plaza. That park, which is public land adjacent to the Corazon development, is a stop on the Music Legends trail named after Roy Velasquez, but has been neglected for years.

Cypress wanted to help rebuild the park because of its role in the community. It will feature two plazas with a tiered structure and a gathering area. Coupled with the sidewalk and street improvements taking shape in East Austin, that stop as well as others on the two trails could bring much more walkability to the area.

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Written by Kate Harrington

Kate is a former reporter, most recently for the Austin Business Journal, where she covered real estate, economic development and transportation. Since 2010 she has been running Thumbtack Communications. Thumbtack provides writing, editing and marketing services. Before moving to Austin in 2002 Kate lived in her native New England, which she still visits often to escape the Texas heat.